Newtype USA Better Watch the Fuck Out

Colony Drop will be producing a one-off fanzine for the 2010 convention season. As the leading anime blog focused on antiquated Japanese animation, who better to produce something in an antiquated form of media? Format is still to be decided, but it…

Colony Drop will be producing a one-off fanzine for the 2010 convention season. As the leading anime blog focused on antiquated Japanese animation, who better to produce something in an antiquated form of media?

Format is still to be decided, but it will be printed on dead trees and feature pretty pictures and cool articles by the cool guys here at your cool anime blog, Colony Drop. It’s also looking like some well-respected members of fandom might be contributing as well.

We aren’t so full of ourselves so as to say it will be the best anime fanzine of all time, but it will surely be the best anime fanzine published in 2010 by people who were mostly born after Carl Macek’s masterpiece Robotech aired on television.

For more information, check out the this post on our forum. Also, we have a forum! Feel free to use it.

20 Comments

  1. Congratulations! Let me say it’s very interesting to read Colony Drop’s perspectives on the 1980s by people not old enough to remember it–that’s how history has to go, after all, including the history of pop culture. I studied the 1960s a lot in school, and have a great fascination with it, even though it was before my own time (MAD MEN is helping people understand the ’60s better, by helping them understand what changed in that decade).

    I think fanzines are a bit like vinyl records–they got mostly left behind by technology, but gradually people realized it’s not just about the technology, it’s about thinking vinyl records are cool (that’s why their sales have actually gone up a bit the last few years). Fanzines can infiltrate territory, something webpages can’t do. As a veteran of the Battle of Okinawa, Jack T. Chick always understood this lesson.

  2. I approve. please do something with patlabor! or even one of the Getters! Its f:)cking criminal that you haven’t done so already

  3. See what you guys have done? You’d better not be yanking our chains on this!

    I won’t be evil and point out that the gang of Psychomuu Gaijin have been doing this sort of thing for years now, but I think CD has a different…soul…in what is desired to be expressed. It should be very interesting.

  4. guys make sure it looks extremely, even groundbreakingly classy, i won’t be putting no coins down for garish shit regardless of prose quality; print is not Internet okay

  5. I will be looking forward to this creation because reading something in a printed format is inherently more pleasurable then reading off a computer screen. Not only is it easier on the eyes but long-form articles are far more digestible when they are in a printed format. The sensation of owning a physical piece of media also adds to the value of the item itself.

  6. I hope it’s all xeroxy and blotchy, the way fanzines were meant to be! None of this color crap — we want toner on our fingers by the time we’re through reading 😛

    Also, make sure to insult Ben Dunn once or twice — always worked for me!

  7. A physical copy for me to spill my 1000s of lives on. AM I RIGHT?

  8. Hey, I just figured out how we can put those losers at ANN out of work and put CD in the driver’s seat of All North American Anime Fandom: hire someone to translate and post Yahoo.jp headlines approximately 5 minutes before Egan Loo does. Yes, it really would be that simple.

  9. Go for it. I’m sick and tired of hearing “print is dead!”; outside the US, print is doing just fine.

    Would love to see what you come up with (but are the NTUSA and Macek jabs really necessary? 8-)), and besides, fanzines were integral to anime’s entrance into the US. Anime did not explode overnight because of the Internet–although the ‘Net could very well be pounding nails into the coffin.

    But that’s just me.

  10. Print *is* dead, sir, and the US market is what matters.

    “NewTypeUSA” and even Anime Insider are gone.

    Another sign that we’re still run by people who mentally are 10-20 years ago, thinking that “a fanzine is important, because its like an actual magazine!”….you get more coverage for cheaper with this website.

  11. Hmmm…V, I hate to tell you this, but “coverage for cheaper” is not necessarily a good thing. And yes, NT USA is gone, as is Anime Insider, but OTAKU USA is still going strong, as is PA, and let’s not forget magazines in Japan and around the world.

    Many are dancing on the grave of print, claiming that it deserves to die. Most don’t think so. Plus, just putting everything on the ‘Net…is the equivalent of “putting all your eggs in one basket.” Some–like say, Harlan Ellison and Berkely Breathed–have made the case that reading only from the net is not the same as reading printed material, and that it’s actually BAD for us.

    I’m not a luddite, or a ‘Net hater. I’ve been using the net for many years now, but “more coverage for cheaper” doesn’t wash. The ‘Net will give information-packed bursts, but that’s it. And don’t even get me started on Wikipedia. At least, that’s been my experience over the years. I prefer to use both mediums to get my news, info, and knowledge. I prefer that choice.

    Kill print, and that choice is gone.

    Of course, there’s always, “But…there’s so much to find on the web!” Yes…but how many websites are worth looking at anyway? Well, there’s Colony Drop, and maybe a couple more…but some sites are packed with just as much vapid garbage as an episode of Glenn Beck.

    Also, some advantages of print:

    –printed books never get corrupted by viruses or worms. You also don’t have to deal crappy customer service.

    –printed material doesn’t need to have its batteries recharged.

    –drop a book, it won’t break.

    –no need to read through idiotic comments that read like “endless, adolescent behavior on the level of a baby showing his pee pee” (Harlan Ellison’s quote, not mine).

    –easier on the eyes (and my eyes ain’t that good to begin with)

    –cheaper than buying equipment to read Net-based material on.

    People who still respect print are not “mentally 10-20 years ago”. Mind you, I find that there are some advantages to the web. But there are just as many advantages to print. And frankly, putting all and everything on the web isn’t the way to go.

    But that’s just me. Thoughts, anyone?

  12. Marc, I’ll continue the positives of print.

    No compatibility issues (Mac Vs. PC, PS3 Vs. Wii, Region 1 Vs. Region 2, etc.)

    Existence not dependent on hosting server/IP/whatever existing. See AOL, Geocities, etc.

    Can be easily transported, mailed and stored. a simple plastic bag will protect it from most any casual harm.

    Won’t be altered or broken by poor handling by TSA (but may still be stolen)

    Won’t be rendered useless by a software upgrade.

    In an emergency can be used as toilet paper, or to help start a fire, or rolled into a tube and used as a splint

    Will still be around after the magnetic pole shift (triggered by an X-Plus class solar flare) utterly wipes out civilization as we know it, so even tho your saved ‘torrent files of all of Naruto will be gone, you can still read of how we hated the show and the people who watch it. BELIEVE IT

    and if all else fails, you can THROW IT ON THE GROUND! “that’s not Dave! that’s a magazine! I’m not stupid!”

  13. Print is an arcane, archaic drug. It provides a sensory and sensual experience which goes way beyond the rationally undoubted benefits of online media.

    Printed matter can be beautiful, crude or shocking but its physical presence is one of its charms. Print has its own range of smells and touch sensations. If you’re a print junkie, the feel and smell of printed matter takes you to places that have nothing to do with content.

    I don’t care if they send the anti-print police round. When they break down the door they’ll find me standing in front of my stash, and if they want to take my books and zines, they can tear them from my cold, dead hands.

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