The Final Eulogy of Tokyopop: America's Greatest Otaku
by Zach - May 26 2011

As of May 31, 2011, Tokyopop, which originally started as Mixx and at one point was one of the largest licensees of manga in North America, will be closing their publication doors. What was once a strong up-start in the U.S. market thanks to the acquisition of hits like Sailor Moon in the 90’s had become a shadow of themselves, losing their once powerful hold on the young adult manga market. In recent years, Japanese publishing giant Kodansha rescinded the rights to titles that had been licensed to Tokyopop, and Borders, Tokyopop’s largest customer, filed for bankruptcy, leaving debts that would never be repaid (as well as many layoffs).

After all is said and done, Tokyopop would’ve been remembered as a company that, while making some questionable choices in their life (OEL manga) published some very high profile titles, and pushed the Japanese “tankobon” format in the Western world, forcing a complete re-structuring of manga publication in America for the foreseeable future.

Would’ve been, had Stu Levy not had his way.

...

You see, Stu Levy isn’t the kind of guy to “just” run a large and popular publishing house — he’s a “big picture” thinker, see? He’s got big plans. Why limit Tokyopop to just doing books when there’s properties to exploit, television shows to air, movies to produce and merchandising to be manufactured? And lest we forget his stint as “DJ Milky", hot deejay and co-creator of Princess Ai with bloated has-been Courtney Love, and his little hobby writing profound and thoughtful “gothic poetry” (I’d like to remind the reader this is a man in his mid-forties).

As you can see, Mr. Levy has quite a bit on his plate, charismatic entrepreneur he is. Levy himself would probably fancy himself the Richard Branson of the “otaku” ethersphere, but to an outsider looking in, he appears to be a man living an extended adolescence, bouncing from one thing to another, with no real focus on any one pursuit. Jack of all trades, master of none. Just look at the way he treats his own publishing company: as a stepping stone to the much more lucrative and glamorous world of “entertainment media.” Why just publish properties you’ve swindled away from college kids with a blood oath contract when you can cut them out of the whole thing by turning them into much more lucrative television and movie properties?

Which brings us to the subject at hand: America’s Greatest Otaku, a piece of work which may be the apex of Stu Levy’s hubris to-date.

Initially pitched as the Tokyopop U.S. tour in the summer of 2010, the stated purpose of this tour was to spread “otaku culture” across the U.S. and visit various locations which would interest fans of anime, manga, and general Japanese culture. As the tour continued, various contestants would be visited in their hometown and interviewed for the chance of a lifetime: A trip to Japan, birthplace of “otaku culture.” Eventually the eight week trip was edited into eight episodes of reality (Internet) television, which ran from March to April 2011 on Internet media hub Hulu.

It became apparent as soon as episode one began streaming that what was being presented could be seen as a reflection of Levy himself: flighty, unfocused, sloppy and awkward. In other words, a train wreck. For the most part, the Internet collectively laughed at Levy and company’s incompetence and abandoned the show; heck, even the hardened anime pirates gave up ripping and torrenting the show after episode two. (And these are people that had no problem fan-subbing all of Qwaser of Stigmata [A Tokyopop title! -Ed.], for God’s sake.)

But this writer stuck with it through all eight episodes. It was painful, long-term medical problems may result. But dammit, I took the red pill, I had to see how deep the rabbit hole went.

Each episode begins with Levy himself as the host, sporting a swatch of bleached hair that, from all indications, seems to be the Scarlet Letter of douche-baggery. Why Levy decided to be the host himself rather than a more charismatic (and, let’s be honest, photogenic) host is between him and his team, but I assume it has something to do with his desire to always be in the middle of everything, no matter the detrimental effects.

The first episode begins with the six kids picked for the tour piling into a bus emblazoned with the likes of Van Von Hunter and the skull mask-sporting main character of I Luv Halloween, properties which have made little financial gain for Tokyopop in general, but are wholly owned by Levy himself, so they will attain as much exposure as he can give them as they are nursed into properties fit to spin into million-dollar-media franchises. Something that becomes apparent very quickly is how few of the locations visited have anything to do with the culture that Levy and crew initially seem to be attempting to present to the audience. With the exception of Anime Expo in the first episode, visited locations descend into a proverbial hell by the second episode with poor team “D & D” getting sent to Salt Lake City to do a segment on the library and cosplay around the Mormon temple grounds. What started as hopeful enthusiasm from the intern hosts turns into visible disappointment as the Otaku Six members are sent to various places in the middle of nowhere with a highly tenuous connection to Japanese culture, pop or other-wise. Rinse and repeat ad-nausea for eight episodes.

America’s Greatest Otaku makes the cardinal mistake of being flat-out boring for long stretches, with graphics and transitions that regularly take too long, sloppy editing in places that would leave even a novice of film-making and video editing screaming “Cut! Cut!” and locations that come off as tedious despite the hosts trying to play them up. When the program features five minutes of your interns trying unsuccessfully to get into a closed Buddhist temple, you probably need to call it a day — and you definitely shouldn’t use the footage in the show. We don’t even get to know the interns themselves beyond their ready-for-The Real World gender and ethnic roles (the white guy, the black guy, the Asian girl, etc.). Maybe if the viewers saw their personalities come through on the long bus rides between states, they would’ve been interesting hosts. As it stands, they remain ciphers to the viewer through no fault of their own, leading to people devoid of personalities droning at the camera for an insufferable amount of time.

The contestants chosen to be interviewed for the series are picked and edited in such a way that it seems the intent was to paint an unfavorable portrait of the average American “otaku.” While there are a handful of interviewees who make their own costumes, and one intriguing Iraqi immigrant who writes and draws her own comics, the rest of the contestants interviewed can be put into one of two categories:

Category-A are fans so caught up in the act of collecting (be it figures, autographs or manga) that it seems there’s never a moment of pause to ask themselves why they consume what they do and to what end. None of them seem to show a penchant for any particular genre, artist, or series they like, and are instead driven by the consumption of product.

Category-B essentially come off as scatter-brained kids who used their time on the show to goof around for the cameras and show off their mediocre drawings, songs and vocal talents, usually doing all of these things and none of them particularly well. They ultimately come off as a waste of the interviewers’ and the viewers’ time.

The contestants paint an ugly picture of the average American in the sub-culture as vapid consumer whores, devoid of anything of self-worth or interest beyond their media consumption, or exhibiting the attitude of a toddler dancing about screaming “Look at me!” Is it an honest portrait of “otaku” at large? Probably. But the goal of this program was to show them in a positive light, which it decisively fails at.

The final episode features the “winner” among the contestants, a lanky black guy named Chris with a penchant for dressing like Mario, going to Japan — not to explore Tokyo at his leisure, but to be followed around Akihabara by a Tokyopop camera crew and have cringe-inducing moments play out inside a maid cafe, a butler cafe, and a live super sentai show populated by six-year-olds and their parents. I’m going to give the guy the benefit of the doubt and assume that these locations were pre-selected by Levy or his crew, and not by Christopher himself, but I will not make excuses for the man when he chooses to walk around Akihabara in a ratty hand-made Mario costume to the chagrin of the viewer (or anybody with a lick of self-awareness).

While America’s Greatest Otaku could be seen as an unintentional smearing of fans of anime and manga in North America, the choices made in locations and editing by Stu Levy and his crew ultimately reflect more poorly on him than any of the guests or hosts featured on the show. After plumbing the depths of all eight episodes, it hit me — Stu Levy is himself America’s greatest otaku: a warped, shallow man-child who has no other pursuits but his own self gratification and exploitation of Japanese culture for his own personal gain. And if his soon-to-be documentary about the tsunami disaster earlier this year is anything like this, his mangling of the culture of the rising sun may be truly just beginning.

So farewell, Tokyopop. It’s too bad a company that built their reputation as a purveyor of manga and Japanese cultural imports wasn’t powerful enough independently from their founder to be remembered for the hundreds of well-received series they translated and published over the years, and will instead be marked as a foot-note, along with America’s Greatest Otaku, in what is sure to be a long list of the eventual failed business ventures in the career and life of Stu Levy.

24 comments

Comment from: sean [Member]

I’m guessing Daryl Surat’s cocaine-fueled rant outside the TokyoPop van at Otakon didn’t make it into the show?

05/26/11 @ 18:46

Comment from: Mangaman [Visitor]

Very well written article. You’ve excellently articulated thoughts I’ve had about Stu Levy for a very long time but could never communicate without coming off as an asshole. I’m glad you took the highroad in this one even though the “positive” portions of the review are mired in half-jest.

Anyways, if it weren’t for this article I would have never discovered Shireen Al-Zahawi, who is pretty damn talented. Her rendition of manga characters breathe new zeal into my dead-fan soul. I feel like reading and reviewing her works.

Thanks Zach. :)

05/26/11 @ 19:53

Comment from: djwhack03 [Visitor] · http://hardworkandguts.wordpress.com

Man, that last episode reminded me of Peepo Choo. Just without Yakuza or a giant crossdresser.

05/26/11 @ 20:11

Comment from: Groove-A [Visitor]

Nicely wrote. Never exposed myself to this show, writing seemed to be all over the wall as to it’s quality. After reading this, you need a medal of some sorts for sitting through all that.

05/26/11 @ 20:52

Comment from: Zeonic Freak [Visitor] · http://animeofyesteryear.blogspot.com/

That one picture of the person dressed like Misty from pokemon looks like some guy I saw a couple of years back at Animazement who dressed just like that. More than likely, its probably him.

I need to get all the Gundam/ Initial D manga from Mixx/Tokyopop before people wanna go crazy to find them.

05/26/11 @ 23:01

Comment from: Avery [Visitor]

This show sounds physically painful to watch. Like, imagine Obama talking over the British national anthem looped over and over for 22 minutes. Eight episodes. I don’t think I could watch that.

05/26/11 @ 23:25

Comment from: The "Real" Avery [Visitor]

Stu Levy sounds like a crazy man I don’t want to meet or grow up to be.

05/26/11 @ 23:40

Comment from: rob [Visitor]

Article could also be dubbed “Eulogy for Stu Levy”

What a shame.

Colonydrop, would appreciate a highlight over the impact of Tokyopop on the industry. Specific instances where they screwed over artists. I’m not entirely caught up with what this company has done to the industry in the last few years…

05/27/11 @ 03:43

Comment from: Zeonic Freak [Visitor] · http://animeofyesteryear.blogspot.com/

>>>Specific instances where they screwed over artists. I’m not entirely caught up with what this company has done to the industry in the last few years…

I just did a podcast episode where me and my crew talked about Tokyopop for a bit, and how their math was kinda “If we license 100 titles, we can get a handful that are gonna be hits.” It worked for them for a while, but that train just couldn’t take the load after a while.

I remember the “Rising Stars of Manga” books they did for a while, which is a good way to promote talent if someone actually got published.

05/27/11 @ 08:40

Comment from: Prague Rock [Visitor]

I enjoy articles like this. I haven’t been to a convention in years (nor do I have a burning desire to attend one) so I feel hopelessly out-of-the-loop when it comes to names and incidents in American anime fandom. On one hand, I don’t really care; on the other, it’s a type of schadenfreude watching these kids kack the bed, staining my enthusiasm a little more every passing year.

05/27/11 @ 19:04

Comment from: Alexeon [Visitor]

I saw the first two episodes and couldnt watch more…

The interview with the Misty guy was interesting because I saw him at that convention (and took a picture to show my friends the horrors of MANsty) so it was neat to see someone I saw on television. Aside from that, the rest of the show made me want to throw up.

05/28/11 @ 13:21

Comment from: Robert Kelly [Visitor]

05/29/11 @ 07:24

Comment from: CMR [Visitor]

This is why I don’t admit to liking anime in public.

05/30/11 @ 00:36

Comment from: Bruce Lewis [Visitor] · http://www.brucelewis.com

TokyoPop offered my writing partner Ed Hill and I a “contract” for an OEL property several years ago. I place “contract” in quotes because the document was the most blatantly sleazy thing I had ever read.

My attorney reviewed the contract and actually, physically laughed about it over the phone with me a few days later. “I don’t know how good Tokyopop’s comics are,” he said “But they have some of the best lawyers I’ve ever seen. This contract basically says you get nothing, unless the title goes big-time, in which case they get everything.”

In the spirit of good sportsmanship we marked up the contract with the changes we wanted and sent it back. Their response: “Tokyopop does not negotiate with artists. Either you take our contract as it is or you leave it.”

We left it. Je ne regrette rien.

05/30/11 @ 02:59

Comment from: rob [Visitor]

>>>I just did a podcast episode where me and my crew talked about Tokyopop for a bit, and how their math was kinda “If we license 100 titles, we can get a handful that are gonna be hits.” It worked for them for a while, but that train just couldn’t take the load after a while.

Yeah. A nice definitive eulogy for MIXX/Tokyopop beyond the idiocies of the American Otaku would really be interesting.

Stuff like Bruce’s story makes my blood boil. Only heard bits and pieces about Tokyopop’s BS contracts. Titles getting cancelled. Artists fighting for rights. Answering the question “Did Tokyopop help the manga industry?” or “Did Tokyopop launch as many homegrown talents as it destroyed them?” seems like something worth exploring…

05/30/11 @ 23:11

Comment from: THX1138 [Visitor]

Category-A fans. Oh dear God Category-A fans. I made this exact same point about otaku culture in an essay I wrote in college a few years ago: its about buying stuff. I mean yeah you’re not going to escape capitalism for a second, but there’s such a huge difference between “I bought this comic and I’m going to lovingly read it several times and really grow to understand why I love and be able to explain why I think its so good” vs. “BUY MORE, BUY MORE NOW, BUY AND BE HAPPY DESU". I’d argue Category-A is just as infantile as Category-B in this way: they don’t care if its good, they only care if its new.

05/31/11 @ 02:49

Comment from: Mike [Visitor]

I can’t help but feel sorry for Tokyopop. If only they had better management at the helm and actually did their research for once maybe they wouldn’t be in this rut they’re in now.

06/03/11 @ 07:47

Comment from: Marc McKenzie [Visitor] · http://redshoulder.deviantart.com/gallery/

@Bruce Lewis: Thanks for telling us about this. I had thought of doing something for TP some time ago, but was never really moved to do anything (and that included thinking of submitting work to the RISING STARS OF MANGA books).

I’m not loosing any sleep over it.

@THX1138: “..but there’s such a huge difference between “I bought this comic and I’m going to lovingly read it several times and really grow to understand why I love and be able to explain why I think its so good” vs. “BUY MORE, BUY MORE NOW, BUY AND BE HAPPY DESU".”

Totally agree. I admit that I have fallen for the “Buy More” a couple of times, but pretty much any comic/artbook I buy is because I plan to read/look at/examine it not once or twice but several times. It’s also based more on artists/shows that I LIKE, and not about what’s popular among the crowd. And if it’s something that I no longer need, I give it away to someone who might appreciate it more.

@Rob: “Answering the question “Did Tokyopop help the manga industry?” or “Did Tokyopop launch as many homegrown talents as it destroyed them?” seems like something worth exploring…”

Most definitely agree with this–it would be very interesting to read.

06/04/11 @ 10:28

Comment from: Sleep Machine [Visitor]

Stu Levy went to Georgetown Law School, no?

Figures.

06/09/11 @ 22:53

Comment from: thewastedyouth [Visitor]

“My attorney reviewed the contract and actually, physically laughed about it over the phone with me a few days later. “I don’t know how good Tokyopop’s comics are,” he said “But they have some of the best lawyers I’ve ever seen. This contract basically says you get nothing, unless the title goes big-time, in which case they get everything.”

I almost died of laughter, sad to see Tokyopop go but the place was full of idiots.


06/20/11 @ 14:46

Comment from: Andrew [Visitor]

I have to admit I thought the first episode was actually OK. But I think after I watched the 2nd or 3rd episode I couldn’t watch anymore. Which is kinda funny cause in the next episode they where going to visit my home city. I was a bit curious what they would show in it, but then I read about it and it didn’t seem interesting. lol

07/01/11 @ 23:51

Comment from: OtakuNoVideo [Visitor]

This isn’t an article it’s a rant from a troll.

08/20/11 @ 17:20

Comment from: Sh1nobi [Visitor]

“This isn’t an article it’s a rant from a troll.”

Hi Stu.

10/19/11 @ 15:31

Comment from: Shinji [Visitor]

trolls everywhere

01/22/12 @ 11:10

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